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Glendale has sneaky way to pursue a pay raise

Editor:

I hope the city councilmembers have read the articles by Laurie Roberts of the Arizona Republic, Connor Dziawura of The Glendale Star and Jen Fifield of the Glendale Republic. I also hope Glendale citizens read this article about how a compensation committee was hastily formed by a councilmember, and four of the members including the mayor voted to have this charter amendment proposal for a 55% pay raise added to the November election ballot. This action — taken at a special meeting during the summer vacation, when all thought any city action would be silent for a while — was a sneaky way to pursue a pay raise.

What is even more revealing when you read the proposed charter amendment change is that they want to eliminate the citizens ever voting for a pay raise for the city council if voters approve this in the November election. Instead of the current charter amendment, which states the citizens must decide if a pay raise is warranted, they have proposed that the city manager or his designee will be able to address this issue of a pay raise by using the median salary of all the Glendale employees to ensure their pay is 1% percent lower on an annual basis.

If this is approved by the voters in November, this will mean they have taken the salary of the council and mayor out of the hands of the citizens and that “We the People” will no longer be able to decide if they deserve a raise based on their performance on policy decisions, leadership skills and accountability issues, which are areas through which the citizens should be able to judge if the city council deserves a pay raise. Also, there are around 248,000 citizens in Glendale, so why would the mayor need 30% more that the councilmembers? He  only has one vote, and pandering to the public with his business-of-the-month plaques does not qualify him for 30% more in pay.

Vote “no” this November to this slap-in-the-face charter amendment.

Gary Livingston, Glendale

Judge Wismer a positive influence

Editor:

It appears there is a grave health problem looming, with young people thinking vaporless cigarettes (vaping) are not harmful to their health. Nothing could be further from the truth, as it is extremely dangerous! Judge Craig Wismer of the Arrowhead Justice Court tells us it is the major cause of juvenile offenders in his court, which is almost certainly the same in all of the Justice Courts. Judge Wismer is bringing this not only to our attention, but is doing something about it. I have had the pleasure of knowing Judge Wismer, and this does not surprise anyone who knows him. He is serving on the bench to try and make a difference. We are all blessed to have such a man as Craig Wismer who, as our judge, is positively influencing all of us as well as our next generation.

Irene Richie, West Valley