Honor in the courtroom and on the court

Phillip Woolbright
Candidate
Justice of the Peace
Arrowhead Precinct

Have you ever been treated unfairly? Had someone take your property? How do you feel when someone pushes you around like a bully? Did you ever have someone lie about you or call you a bad name? 
It would be nice to have someone there to defend us and yell foul. 
I am your candidate for justice of the peace and in comparison I provide basketball referee services for schools in Arizona. As a judge or referee, I do not give credit because someone is a lawyer or a great coach. I cannot be bought or behave like a puppet. I don’t get influenced by city council members or government officials. I am impartial. 
It has been said, “At a basketball game, I want Woolbright for a fair call.” And “When a lawyer is on the other side of the aisle, I want Woolbright as my justice of the peace.”
I have much more experience in the courtroom and on the basketball court than any opponent. 
Laws are made to define “fair play” and you need a justice of the peace to cry foul when a law is broken. Rules in a basketball game are for “fair play” also and a referee is needed to make sure a fair game is played. 
On a basketball court, I have a discussion before every game with the coaches and captains of the teams. We discuss “victory with honor.” It means that winning is not paramount. Good sportsmanship and fair play is more important than doing something underhanded to win. We play the game on a court, two teams, referees and a final score. Sometimes, honor is broken and poor sports start fighting or name calling. As a referee, I set it straight.
There is a discussion in a court before the “lawsuit game.” We take an oath to tell the truth. That oath is a promise of “victory with honor.” 
Of course, in court we have an arena, known as our courtroom. We have two sides known as the plaintiff and defendant. And as a justice of the peace, I make a fair call. Then, we have a so-called winner and loser. Often, one element of honor is missing in our courtrooms: telling the truth.
There is no honor in poor sportsmanship and no integrity in lies. Name-calling and dishonesty has character flaw written all over it. My experience as a justice of the peace has taught me to be an excellent judge of character. 
I have witnessed the character of political opponents firsthand, and there is no honor in underhanded political behavior. If there is no honor, don’t play the game. Fill out a resume, find a new job and have some respect for yourself. Sadly, living without honor is all some people have in their attempt to win. Victory with honor is sweeter. I am asking the voters to be the referee in August and vote Woolbright.

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Peoria Times
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