Peoria Unified School District

School districts in Glendale and Peoria are asking residents for more than a quarter billion dollars in funding.

Glendale and Peoria voters are being asked to approve more than a quarter billion dollars in school funding.

The Peoria Unified School District, which has schools in Glendale and Peoria, and Glendale Union High School District have ballot measures asking voters for funding.

The voters of Glendale Union High School District No. 205 will decide on a $130 million bond. The district has nine high schools in Glendale and Northwest Phoenix.

According to the bond information pamphlet, the $130 million is to be used at GUHSD for constructing and renovating school buildings; purchasing transportation vehicles; improving school grounds; and purchasing furniture, equipment and technology.

Kim Mesquita, a GUHSD spokeswoman, said, “If approved, the bond funds will protect money allocated for the classroom, not cause a tax rate increase and will be used in the following ways: renovations/repairs of aging schools/buildings; critical technology/internet upgrades; implement safety and security features; maintenance for roofs, HVAC systems, parking lots; update outdoor athletic facilities at all high schools; maintain reliable buses for student transportation; performing arts upgrades.”

The Glendale Star repeatedly asked GUHSD representatives for specific projects the $130 bond would fund.

At press time, no response has been received.

The Peoria Unified School District is asking for  a continuation of a 13% maintenance and operations (M&O) budget override and a $125 million bond election.

According to PUSD, the $125 million bond would pay for:

• Renovation and essential and critical improvements at existing schools and support centers.

• Implementation of safety features at all school sites.

• Replacement of student and staff computer devices, servers and technology infrastructure.

• Replacement of student transportation vehicles, including special education and activity buses.

• Acquiring land for future construction of a new high school.

Asked for specific examples, PUSD provided assessment reports from several schools.

A Cactus High assessment identified “deficiencies with a high priority,” including concrete walks, standardized signage and field irrigation system.

A Centennial High assessment identified “deficiencies with a high priority,” including replace exhaust fans, standardized signage, refurbish student lockers and replace restroom partitions.

Cactus and Centennial both require more than $13 million in improvements and repairs, according to the assessments.

An assessment of Marshall Ranch Elementary School found nearly $7 million needed in repairs and improvements, including a sewer line backup, drinking fountains, skylight replacement and painting.